Biography Chronology Home Search Speeches/Statements

1995 - Mr Major’s Doorstep Interview at Wellington Park

Below is the transcript of Mr Major’s doorstep at Wellington Park on 3rd May 1995.


QUESTION:

Did you give the trade unions any reassurance on the Document?

PRIME MINISTER:

What we have been talking about - I think there are two aspects - that is one of them, that is part of it. First, I would just like to express publicly what I have said privately and that is to thank the trade unions in Northern Ireland for the work that they have done against sectarianism, originally anti-sectarianism, now non-sectarianism. I think they have played a remarkable role in the workshop to try and remove those discriminations. I was pleased to congratulate them on that this morning and encourage them to continue with their counteract programme, as I'm sure they will. What we spent most of our time discussing this morning was economic matters in their generality, including employment prospects. At the moment unemployment is falling more rapidly in the United Kingdom than anywhere else in Europe and it is falling more rapidly in Northern Ireland than anywhere else in the United Kingdom, more rapidly here therefore than anywhere else in Europe, and more people are getting into work. Now that will continue provided we are able to continue with the investment and continue with the changed and more confident aspect that exist in Northern Ireland since the ceasefire. Providing that is maintained, providing that is built upon, providing we can carry that process to a conclusion, then I think the economic future for Northern Ireland is infinitely brighter than Northern Ireland has seen at any stage in its history, so there is a very great prize for Northern Ireland, and I'm very keen to ensure that we carry the process forward: firstly, for self-evident political reasons, but secondly, because the economic changes it will make to all the people in Northern Ireland today and in the future will be very remarkable. We're on our way but there's a long way still to go.